Remember when you were younger and your grandmother would say, “My elbow’s acting up; it’s going to rain.” Or your uncle would rub his knee and say, “A cold snap’s coming.” You thought they were… well, crazy… until, sure enough, the skies open up and the temperature plummeted. Is this just coincidence, an old wives’ tale that sometimes comes true? Can your knee pain really predict winter weather? Let’s find out!



We know, we know: winter is the perfect time to hibernate! To eat hearty soups and stews, make holiday cookies, and become best friends with our couches. But our bodies — and our minds — quickly feel the effects of inactivity. Cold weather isn’t an excuse to stop our fitness journeys. In fact, it’s the ideal time to ramp up our efforts and make terrific strides (literally) towards better health.



Are you interested in exploring chiropractic care?

Maybe conventional medicine is not addressing your chronic pain adequately. Maybe you haven’t been able to enjoy exercise or daily activities because of back and neck discomfort. Maybe you wish to avoid invasive procedures and treatments like surgery. Maybe you want to take a proactive approach to your health and prevent pain, injury, and illness.



INCONCEIVABLE!

This word always reminds me of the movie “The Princess Bride,” where the character, Vizzini, says “INCONCEIVABLE!” over and over no matter what situation he finds himself in. And the infamous Inigo Montoya’s reply, “You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.”

All jokes aside, over the past few weeks, it seems some of our patients, who DO know what the word means, thought the same thing:



The five senses, that is, the sense of sight, touch, hearing, taste, and smell, provide us with necessary information regarding the world around us.1 These precious capabilities enable us to navigate our environment with seemingly instantaneous feedback with reference to our actions and activities in our immediate surround. The loss of one or more of the five senses requires compensatory enhancements of the remaining senses, the long-term results of which may lead to equivalences in capability and optimized functioning. Regardless of the number of sensory formats to which one has access, it is important to recognize that all individuals need to maintain high levels of health and well-being to derive the greatest benefit from their physiological processes and sensory inputs.